​​LSS Committee

The LSS Committee strengthens quality management systems by promoting the sustainability of public health laboratory systems and supporting the improvement of accuracy and reliability of laboratory results and services in member laboratories.  The Committee identifies and develops tools and resources to optimize the performance quality of member laboratories and their system.

Priorities

  • Support national, state, local and regional public health laboratory system models

  • Develop a mechanism for measuring the two Healthy People 2030 developmental objectives on laboratory services

  • Support continuous quality improvement in member laboratories by providing tools, training, evaluation and consultation to meet regulatory requirements

  • Function as a liaison between public health laboratories, regulatory agencies, professional organizations and other stakeholders, i.e. CMS and PHAB

LSS Committee Quality Systems Publications

For more information, contact Tina Su, MPH, manager, Quality Systems and Analytics, 240.485.2729, bertina.su@aphl.org.

Knowledge Management Committee

Knowledge management is "the process of capturing, developing, sharing and effectively using organizational knowledge."* The Knowledge Management Committee (KMC) provides guidance on effective management and use of APHL information resources for members to improve laboratory processes, procedures and systems. The committee adapts, develops, collects, organizes, and disseminates tools to promote public health practice.

Priorities

  • Collect, develop, and introduce Knowledge Management (KM) practices and tools to improve laboratory management

  • Guide and support the Quality Systems & Analytics (QSA) program on interpretation of findings from analyzing different APHL surveys

  • Promote the use of APHL resources including tools and data driven dashboards

Resources

For more information, contact Andrea Wright, specialist, Quality Systems and Analytics, 240.485.2756 andrea.wright@aphl.org

Footnotes

Davenport, Thomas H. (1994). "Saving IT's Soul: Human Centered Information Management." Harvard Business Review 72 (2): 119–131​